Chambertin-Clos de Bèze Grand Cru

Acclaimed Terrain

Located in the Gevrey-Chambertin commune, Chambertin-Clos de Bèze is part of group of seven Grand Cru climats which all have “Chambertin” as part of their name. The terroir of this particularly acclaimed terrain is seen as a slightly higher quality above the other seven Chambertin climats, in part due to the allowed production yield being slightly less. The history of this land is also particularly unique. In AD 630, Algamaire, a Duke of Burgundy, gifted the Cistercian nuns of the Abbey of Béze with land that comprised Clos de Béze, which they cultivated successfully into a Grand Cru worthy vineyard. Six centuries later, the field next to the abbey was bought by a man named Bertin. The field became known as Champs de Bertin, or “Bertin’s field”. Bertin also planted vines on his field, and the name was soon compacted to Chambertin. In 1702, a vigneron named Claude Jobert bought both the nun’s land and Bertin’s field and joined them together, uniting both Chambertin and Clos de Béze.

Varietal: Pinot Noir

Our Chambertin-Clos de Bèze Grand Cru Vintages

Chambertin-Clos de Bèze Grand Cru 2013

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A Ruby Jewel

As you would expect of a Clos de Béze Grand Cru, this is a wine where opulence and elegance meet in the middle. The first aromas to fight their way up to the top are strawberry, gooseberry, blackcurrant, with a little lick of licorice, fruit pits and spice on the backend. You may discover violet, moss and undergrowth in there too. A complex and intense palate that would be best served by a ten-year sentence locked away in your cellar out of sight, out of mind. Should you desire to consummate your love for this Chambertin Clos de Bèze Grand Cru 2013 then we recommend feathered game, roasted lamb, or a thick cut of juicy Rib-Eye. The two will dance together like Ginger and Fred.

Force of Nature

After the small yield, but succulent flavors, of the 2012 vintage, 2013 was another year that mother earth proved its hegemony over the vignerons and vignobles of Burgundy. The bud break was relatively late, seeping into June, following a cold, rainy and frigid Spring. Throughout June, a deluge of rain delayed floraison (flowering), introducing an increased risk of blight. Pommard, as well as surrounding appellations Volnay, Beaune and Savigny-lès-Beaune, also experienced a near-fatal hailstorm, identical to the thunderous power that struck in 2012. In July and August, the weather transformed again, this time for the better. Warm temperatures and sunshine clothed the vines – with some summer downpours relinquishing the heat – guiding the grapes to ripen delightfully at the end of September. Harvest began around September 23rd, with the vineyards bare of all ripe fruit come October 2nd. The year’s unstable conditions struck again with huge storms across the region’s vineyards on October 5th and 6th. Thankfully, just a few days too late to do any more damage to the net yield. Overall, this small vintage has incredible potential. We should all be thankful.

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